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Rex Sorgatz

Idea: a chain of popup stores. (I don't know what it even means, but it seems like everything is now either a chain or a popup store.)

mar 27
2006

catching up with friends

My life coach (Daily Show | NYT Styles) says I better get blogging again because not even Amanda reads me anymore. So here are some links:

FRIENDS

I have much to talk about, but first here are some updates from various Friends of Fimoculous:

Tapes 'N Tapes were on last week's Best Week Ever. After taking SXSW by storm (and landing an 8.3 on Pitchfork), last night they played the last show on this tour here in Seattle. They were awesome.

Diablo Cody was on Letterman last week. So best, go girl.

Michaelangelo Matos has exited his perch as the music critic at the Seattle Weekly to join the up-and-coming eMusic. For his final goodbye, he gives a farewell mixed tape to Seattle.

Waxy is still fighting Bill Cosby.

Elizabeth Spiers' DealBreaker.com launches on Wednesday. Interview.

Chuck Olsen interviewed Bruce Sterling.

Klosterman wrote an essay for the upcoming Criterion version of Dazed & Confused. His forthcoming book, Chuck Klosterman IV, is a collection of his previously-published work.

MNstories did a video of my farewell party in Minneapolis. That's really not me crying at the end.

TV

Whoa, did you know Andy Milonakis is 30 years old? According to The Times, he has a growth hormone condition. He's the Gary Coleman of our times!

In addition to VH1's Web Junk 20 and Bravo's Viral Videos, other upcoming projects include a show on USA based upon eBaum's World and a show on NBC called The Net With Carson Daly. In the future, everyone will create a viral video.

The first season of Wonder Showzen is coming out on DVD this week.

BOOKS

Which is more peculiar -- that Terry Gross' interview with J.T. LeRoy is online without any notation of recent events, or that J.T. LeRoy sounds so obviously like a chick in the interview?

Enter the ISBN number of a book into BarnesAndNoble.com and get a quote for how much they will buy it for. Cool.

I've been busy alphabetizing my CDs and running to Ikea for book shelves, so somewhere along the way I missed that Malcolm Gladwell started a blog.

Although I'm morally obligated to read every book even remotely related to the internet (especially if it has something to do with blogging), I haven't decided whether to dive into Kos' Crashing The Gate. The decent NYTBR review includes the first chapter, so maybe that's a good starting point.

FILM

[Insert Snakes on a Plane link here.]

Well, at least William Gibson liked V is for Vendetta.

A second Scanner Darkly trailer.

Bob Saget is friggin nuts.

MUSIC

Go read Douglas Coupland's "interview" with Morrisey, which is really an essay on the state of the interview.

Even Tom Waits once did a commercial -- for dog food, no less. It's especially interesting since he later sued Frito-Lay for impersonating him.

ONLINE

There's hope for all of us: Jason and Meg got married. Remember when they sorta spatted on Blogumentary?

Newsweek's cover story: Putting the 'We' in the Web.

You've probably read Danah's essay on why Friendster lost to MySpace, but here's the link anyway.

CITIES

The Top 15 Skylines in the World.

GAMES

One of the many things I like about Wired is that it truly is a magazine. That is, for all the talk about the death of print, Wired stories are the best example of the perfection of a medium that doesn't easily translate into other mediums. You can, for instance, read most of Will Wright's game issue online, but it's not nearly the experience that the magazine is. (See also: Wright doing a walk-through of Spore.)

GOOGLE

On the new Google Finance, you won't find this info: how much of Google stock that Google execs have sold.

FOOD

Every side-street around Microsoft campus seems to have one of those create-a-home-meal shops, so I'm not surprised to learn that Seattle is home to one of the biggest chains. From the NYT story: "The prototype, a kind of elevated cooking session among friends in a commercial kitchen, popped up in the Northwest in 1999. The concept did not take off until 2002, when two Seattle-area women streamlined the process so customers could make 12 dinners for six in two hours for under $200. That company became Dream Dinners, which opened a year later and now has 112 franchise stores, with 64 under construction." (Old MNspeak thread on the MSP-based versions.)

4 comments

Don't call it a come-back.

posted by Rex at 2:15 AM on March 27, 2006

*audience noise* ROCK

posted by chuck at 12:27 PM on March 27, 2006

I just figured you were too busy working to post. That's my excuse.

posted by taulpaul at 1:08 PM on March 28, 2006

No love from Amanda for LR either. *Sniff.* But how utterly predictable a list from her anyway. I was hoping for something, I dunno, saucier. Buzzmachine, Gawker, AdRants, BoingBoing - all great blogs, don't get me wrong. But that's like naming The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Who and Aerosmith your favorite bands. C'mon, Congdon! Welcome back, Rex. The world needs laughter!

posted by Safran at 2:42 PM on March 29, 2006




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